Broussard's Reopens After $1M Renovation

By M.D. Dupuy | noladefender.com

French Quarter business owners understand that sometimes, it costs a pretty penny to look a hundred years old. For the first time since 1970, Broussard’s Restaurant (819 Conti St.) is in post-renovation phase. The restaurant reopened last night, after a million-dollar facelift. Even with the modern updates, new owners aimed to maintain Broussard’s Vieux Carre aesthetic and cuisine. Since its founding, the bar has had a soft spot for Napoleonic décor, drinks, and food.

“We are honored to carry on the traditions of excellence that Joe and Rosalie Broussard passionately shared with diners,” states Zeid Ammari, Chief Operating Officer of Creole Cuisine. “As we look to the future we remain resolute in our commitment of returning Broussard’s Restaurant to the glamour and refinement of the past, while providing an elegant sense of modernity.”

The company purchased the restaurant from Chef Gunter and Evelyn Preuss, the most recent owners. Joseph Broussard and wife Rosalie Borrello opened the restaurant in 1920, and the couple above the establishment until they died in 1966.

The three dining rooms have gotten a makeover, boasting new paint, carpet, fixtures, artwork, and more. New Executive Chef Guy Reinbolt is updating classic New Orleans dishes without jeopardizing the restaurant’s Creole roots.

Entrees include a Kalamata Crusted Halibut, served with a creole tomato confit, jasmine rice risotto, and a sweet pea puree. Other decadent dishes include the wild mushroom dusted ostrich filet, as well as the veal, brie, and gulf shrimp paupiette.

Of course, classics like pecan crusted gulf shrimp, corn and crab bisque, and Louisiana lump crab cakes made it on to the menu.

The bar area, now the Empire Bar, has been refurbished with new white marble table and counter tops, imported from Italy. Head bartender Paul Gustings will expand the Napoleonic theme to the cocktail menu. A few signature items are Gusting's Pimm’s Cup, Cherry Brandy, Nuremberg Punches, and English Milk Punches.

Source: noladefender.com